SLAP! Rope Jam

Practice makes perfect! The SLAP! Rope Jam is for rope enthusiasts to meet, connect and learn, regardless of their skill levels.

Rope Jam is a peer learning event, and is open to even complete beginners (both tops and bottoms). Many of us began our foray into ropes through workshops and self-learning, but this rope journey is often a lonely one. For the rope bottoms, there is seldom a chance to socialise, exchange tips, and share problems with other bottoms. For tops, there is hardly an occasion to observe how other tops tie. The aim of Rope Jam is to provide a safe and open space for members of the community to practise and explore. We can all learn something and find the answers to our questions from the shared experiences of the community.

Format: Peer learning, individual practice
Level: All levels of experience. Suitable for complete beginners
Equipment: See below
Attire: Comfortable, form-fitting clothing. Yoga/dance/tights attire is ideal.

The event will start off with an hour or so of facilitated peer learning in small groups to tap on our collective wisdom. The group part (#togethertime) will be pretty free flowing, covering topics that participants want to focus on that week. If you want to have a discussion on how to be a better bottom, or need advice on a particular tie you have been learning, this will be a good time to ask. Beginners will also be guided through a basic 101 on ropes and communication/negotiation during this time. Following that, the remaining 2 hours are free practice time for participants to work on their rope practice in their own favourite corners.

The venue will have 4-6 suspension points and abundant space for floorwork. Please be mindful of your noise level at the venue and clean up after yourselves. Nudity and sexual play will not be permitted at this event.

To find out more, please check out our Fetlife page.

Some ideas (a non-exhaustive list) we have for #togethertime include:

For everyone:

  • How to communicate with your partner
  • Anatomy. Nerves, joints, etc.
  • How to become more involved in the process of making the scene successful for both of you

For bottoms:

  • How to identify good pain vs bad pain
  • How to to last longer in ropes, make ties more sustainable
  • How to have good body awareness, knowing your own body
  • Knowing your own limitations
  • Stretching exercises

For tops:

  • Deeper explorations into various ways to tie a single-column, and advantages/disadvantages
  • Different ways to join rope
  • Hair ties
  • Rope handling drills
  • Futomomo/TK/Chest Harness/Hip Harness/Agura/pattern variations
  • TK 3rd rope variants
  • Different ways to tie/attach suspension lines
  • Many others

FAQ

What should bottoms expect?
You can bottom at your own comfort level, or try a new tie. Please be aware of your own body’s limitations and expect to have proper negotiations before agreeing to be tied. Active communication between top and bottom is fundamental to a satisfying scene.

What should tops expect?
You can learn and practise rope at your own pace, and build up your rope confidence. You should be respectful, and take responsibility for your actions. If you need guidance, we are happy to share what we know. However, note that this is a peer learning event and not a workshop, so other participants will also have things they want to accomplish during the event.

I’m new to ropes, can I come?
Sure, Rope Jam is a low pressure event where you can absorb information at your own pace. We can teach you the basics during the first part of the event to get you started on your rope journey. There will be a briefing about negotiations, consent and safety for all newcomers.

Do I need a partner? Can I come alone?
It is a good idea to sign up with someone you are comfortable with tying. However, a partner is not necessary for the event. We can try to pair people up, but taking initiative and being open to approaching and negotiating with other participants will definitely lead to more fruitful partnerships. If you intend to come just to observe how other people do their thing or practise self-tying, that’s also okay! No pressure!

What is permitted at the event?
This is a rope event so only rope related scenes are allowed. Sexual play and nudity are not permitted. Due to our venue, loud activities such as spanking are also not allowed.
Photography of your ties is permitted, but please make sure you have the expressed permission of everyone in the shot, including in the background.
Please be respectful of other participants’ boundaries and space, and do not interrupt scenes that are on-going unless those in the scene have been asked beforehand.

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Asia Kink Con (SG) Rope Instructor/Performer: Nawakiri Shin

Shin

SLAP! is pleased to announce that Nawakiri Shin will be performing and teaching at Asia Kink Con (SG) 2015. (November 20th – 21st)

Nawakiri Shin started learning shibari in 2004. He is a founding member of BDSM.TW, the only BDSM support group in Taiwan, and the author of Essence of Shibari, 繩縛本事, a Chinese book on shibari.

He has performed in various events, both local and international, including Toubaku 2011 in Tokyo, London Festival of the Art of Japanese Rope Bondage 2012 and 2013, Asia Adult Expo in 2013, and in the Taipei Fringe Festival every year during 2011 – 2014. Besides performing, he also teaches shibari classes in Taipei every week.

Early in his career as a rope artist, he developed a reputation for his dynamic style, speedy tying, and dramatic performances. Over the years he has been transitioning into a more intimate, emotional style of bondage, creating a sense of love and connection which he hopes the audience will share.

More about Nawakiri Shin

Workshops taught:

  • Shibari 101. Starting out with rope bondage
  • Tying with connection
  • Intermediate rope

Please join SLAP! and turn email notifications on to receive the latest updates and signup information for Asia Kink Con (SG).

Basic Rope Handling: Joining/Extending Rope for Shibari

To maintain fluidity and increase the speed of tying, Shibari typically uses medium length ropes of 7-10m. This means that you will have to extend your ropes regularly while tying.

Safety

A knot is required to join the ropes together. If the knot is located at a point where it will place pressure on nerves and arteries, this can be dangerous. Adjust the positioning of the knot to avoid placing pressure over danger points. Common danger points include the nerves under the armpit, as well as radial nerve on the upper arm. The knot should never be under your armpit or on your upper arm wraps in a takate kote.

Methods

1. Lark’s head

  • Your rope needs to have knotted ends.
  • Both ends of the rope must be even. If the ends are uneven, all the pressure will be placed on the longer end of the rope. To remedy this, go to the last point at which the old rope crosses another structural rope, and loop the longer end around it until both sides are even.

2. Sheet Bend (Preferred)

The sheet bend is my preferred method of extending rope as it is more versatile.

  • It works on rope without knotted ends, such as ropes with whipped ends.
  • It works even when the ends of the rope are uneven.
  • It allows you to join a new rope anywhere along the old rope. This is important for avoiding pressure points (see safety note).

There are two commonly used methods. The first involves directly tying a sheet bend. This is my preferred method.

The second method involves separating or splitting the 2 loops of a lark’s head to form a sheet bend. (same video as in part 1)

Singapore Learn And Play (SLAP!) is a non-profit group that delivers quality learning experiences for the Singapore BDSM community. SLAP! Rope Socials are casual events revolving around rope bondage, meant for both riggers and bottoms. Demonstrate your favorite ties and exchange tips and techniques with other attendees. For more information on our upcoming events, visit our Fetlife discussion group or sign up for our mailing list

Somerville Bowline: A more secure single column tie

When Nawakiri Shin was at the SLAP! rope social in November, he showed us a more secure way to tie a single-column tie called the Somerville Bowline. This was originally invented by @Topologist in 2009.

The most common type of single-column tie, the Boola Boola, has a tendency to collapse if the line tension shifts and comes in from the wrong direction. The Somerville bowline addresses this weakness and is stable under tension from multiple directions. It tends to be a bit looser, and is less suitable for ties that require tight wraps.

The original blog post describing the tie can be found HERE.

Here’s a video tutorial on how to do the Somerville Bowline:

 

Singapore Learn And Play (SLAP!) is a non-profit group that delivers quality learning experiences for the Singapore BDSM community. SLAP! Rope Socials are casual events revolving around rope bondage, meant for both riggers and bottoms. Demonstrate your favorite ties and exchange tips and techniques with other attendees. For more information on our upcoming events, visit our Fetlife discussion group or sign up for our mailing list

Rope Safety and Nerve Injuries

Photographer: immoralrestraint Model: adriannamay

Photographer: immoralrestraint
Model: adriannamay

One of our members recently posted a guide on Fetlife about various resources covering rope safety. With their permission, we are re-posting it here. [We have also added new links that we’ve found useful]

As rope bondage is one of the most popular kinks among our members, we think it’s important that both bottoms and tops are aware of the risks involved in rope bondage, and take appropriate steps to mitigate that risk. Play safe and have fun!


I’ve been reading about rope safety because I’ve heard a lot about the risks of nerve injury. Thought it would be good to share what I’ve found.

Links

Remedial RopesSite focused on rope safety, with a heavy emphasis on nerve damage.

A guide for rope bottoms and bondage models This link has photos of good and bad rope placement.

On My Nerves, Part 1 (signs of a bondage injury) Lists warning signs and gives some basic anatomy.

Nerve and Circulation Problems This link has diagrams that might be helpful.

The Little Guide to Getting Tied Up (Including Suspensions)

This is a book by Evie Vane. Covers more than all the online articles I’ve seen combined. Also includes stuff about the psych side of rope bottoming, e.g. mindfulness, communication, and instincts. It’s super detailed and useful.

Relevant Discussion Groups on Fetlife

Rope Bottom’s Roundtable

Riggers and Rope Sluts

Rope Incident Reports